With green tea high blood pressure is history!

By drinking green tea high blood pressure is something you can prevent, according to a long-term Chinese study.

According to the US Heart Lung and Blood Institute high blood pressure (HBP or hypertension) can cause coronary heart disease, heart failure, stroke, kidney failure, atherosclerosis and other health problems.

About 1 in 3 adults (around 72 million people) in the United States has high blood pressure.

High blood pressure is one of the major risk factors for cardiovascular-related deaths, accounting for 20% to 50% of all deaths!

Unfortunately HBP has no symptoms so you can have a high blood pressure without knowing it. Meanwhile it can damage your heart, blood vessels, kidneys, and other parts of your body.

With green tea high blood pressure risk decreases by 50% to 65%!

They arrived at this impressive conclusion after studying 1,500 men and women who drank tea on a daily basis for at least a year.

Habitual green tea drinkers who drank more than 4 ounces (or 120 ml) green tea a day for at least one year had 50% less chance of developing high blood pressure than non-habitual green tea drinkers.

If they drank 20 ounces (or 600 ml) or more on a daily basis the risk was further reduced by 65%!

Those who did not drink green tea had no protection against developing high blood pressure.

Previous (short-term) studies showed conflicting results; some couldn’t find a relation between green tea and blood pressure, others did.

What’s different about this 8-year study is that they examined the long-term effects of tea drinking, while taking external factors into account that could possibly conflict with the tea effects. External factors are differences in lifestyle (smoking, alcohol and sodium intake), diet, medication, physical activity and family history.

Green tea contains flavonoids, a type of polyphenols or antioxidant compounds, who seem to be responsible for protecting against high blood pressure, and ultimately against heart disease.

green-tea-high-blood-pressure1. What is blood pressure?

Blood pressure is the force of blood pushing against the walls of the arteries as the heart pumps out blood. If this pressure increases and stays high over time, it can damage the body.

2. Causes of high blood pressure

There are many factors that may cause arteries to narrow, thereby increasing blood pressure. The most important ones are:

  • Certain medical issues, such as chronic kidney disease or sleep apnea may cause your blood pressure to rise.
  • Certain medicines, such as cold-relief products, may also cause your blood pressure to rise.
  • Age: the older you get, the more likely your blood pressure will rise; HBP tends to rise with age. Over half of all Americans aged 60 and older have high blood pressure.
  • Lifestyle habits, such as eating too much salt (sodium) or not enough potassium, drinking too much alcohol, not exercising enough, or smoking, raise your risk for HBP.
  • Overweight or obesity: if you’re overweight or obese you are more likely to develop high blood pressure. Overweight means more body weight from muscle, bone, fat, or water and obesity means you suffer from too much body fat.

3. Prevent high blood pressure

It’s important to develop a healthy way of living.

Healthy habits include following a healthy diet (not too much salt but enough potassium), working out regularly, quit smoking, learning to cope with stress, and minimizing your alcohol intake.

And last but not least, including green tea to your daily diet is a good idea if you want to avoid high blood pressure! Green tea high blood pressure: one eliminates the other.


Green tea and CHOLESTEROL FACTS!

Green tea INGREDIENTS.

Green tea and HEALTH.

ANTIOXIDANTS.

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Sources “green tea high blood pressure”

Hypertension control: report of a WHO Expert Committee. World Health Organ Tech Rep Ser. 1996;862:1-83.

Yang YC, et al: The protective effect of habitual tea consumption on hypertension. Arch Intern Med. July 2004; 164: 1534-40.

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